Research Areas

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Healthcare & Assistive Robotics


Robot-Assisted Surgery & Micromanipulation

Development and Evaluation of Novel Mechatronic Tracheostomy Tube for Automated Tracheal Suctioning

Mechanical ventilation is required to aid patients with breathing difficulty to breathe more comfortably. A tracheostomy tube inserted through an opening in the patient neck into the trachea is connected to a ventilator for suctioning. Currently, nurses spend millions of person-hours yearly to perform this task. To save significant person-hours, an automated mechatronic tracheostomy system is needed. This system allows for relieving nurses and other carers from the millions of person-hours spent yearly on tracheal suctioning. In addition, it will result in huge healthcare cost savings. [read more ...]​

[Click here to view poster]

Principal Investigator: Professor Phee Soo Jay, Louis​                                                                    Current Project


Magnetically Actuated Ingestible Weight Management Capsule

Intra-gastric balloon (IGB) has become an efficient and minimally invasive method for obesity treatment. The use of traditional IGB requires complex insertion tools and flexible endoscope to place and remove the balloon inside the stomach, which may cause discomfort and complications to the patient. To overcome these drawbacks, we developed a novel ingestible weight-loss capsule with remote-controlled balloon inflation and deflation using an on-board actuator. In animal studies, the designed robotic capsule demonstrated likely benefits of improved patient comfort and effectiveness in weight loss without requiring complex insertion and removal tools. Although the designed weight-loss capsule showed promising results, on-board actuator mechanisms and electronic devices created a large capsule size with its attendant risks. In addition, power consumption limitation and available space within the capsule are the main technical drawbacks. [read more ...]

[Click here to view poster]

Principal Investigator: Professor Phee Soo Jay, Louis​​                                                                    Current Project​


Vision-Aided Active Handheld Instrument for Microsurgery 


We developed an active handheld instrument that detects its own motion, distinguish between undesired and intended motion, and deflects its tip for active compensation of physiological tremor. This project will extend the said capability with image-processing and computer vision techniques to create a handheld vision-aided microsurgical interventional device. [read more ...]


Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project


Computer Vision Guided Automated Embryo Biopsy

More details coming soon.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project


Variable Stiffness Actuator

More details coming soon.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project


Micro-Motion Sensing System

Detecting micro motion of a microsurgical instrument in real time to aid training of new surgeons and discover more findings about tremor nature of human's hand. [read more ...]



Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​​​


Real-Time Image Stabilizer

Design a zero-phase adaptive filter to accurately separate voluntary and involuntary camera movements in real-time. Filtering of erroneous motion allows to compensate for it while preserving the user's intentional movements. [read more ...]



Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Intelligent Handheld Instrument for Active Error Compensation in Medical and Biotech Micromanipulation Applications

To enhance human positioning tasks requiring micro level accuracy (e.g. microsurgery, cell micromanipulation). The intelligent instrument will detect motion, distinguish undesired and intended motion and provide real-time active error compensation by deflecting its tip to compensate physiological tremor and other erroneous movement components. [read more ...]


Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​​


Vision-guided Robotic Cell Micromanipulation

A vision-guided robotic approach is proposed to replace human intervention. A 3 degree-of-freedom piezoelectric-driven robotic manipulator is used to hold a micropipette. A high speed camera captures images of the cells and the micropipette tip under a conventional microscope, processes the images, and controls the robotic manipulator in real-time to perform the intended task. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Assessment and Training System for Micromanipulation Tasks in Surgery

Human accuracy limitations due to physiological tremor restricts the types of feasible microsurgical procedures in microsurgery (e.g., eye, hand, neuro-surgery) making it necessary to train apprentice surgeons and assess their performances. This project investigates the causes of non-voluntary deviations hindering the quality of interventions and develop a virtual reality based training system for training microsurgeons to perform manipulation tasks under a microscope. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Rehabilitation Robotics & Assistive Technology

Refinement & Clinical Evaluation of the H-Man: A Novel, Portable and Inexpensive Planar Robot for Arm Rehabilitation after Stroke

H-Man is a compact low cost robot designed for the rehabilitation/training of planar arm movements. It has an H-shaped cable-driven differential mechanism. The advantage of this mechanism is that it results in a system that is homogeneous, lightweight, and intrinsically safe for use. It can provide forces of up to 30 N at the end-effector (handle) in any specified direction in a planar workspace to assist or resist the motion of the user; and can be easily built using off the shelf components. [read more ...]

[Click here to view poster]​​

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Domenico Campolo​                                                     Current Project


Multi-Nested Myoelectric Control of a Complaint Composite Actuation for Exoskeletons​

Researchers have designed and implemented a soft wearable exoskeleton for upper limb. The device is intended to provide assistance to people with neuromuscular disorder. The objective of this project is to introduce a textile-based structure contrary to the conventional rigid linkages, offering natural, smooth and unconstrained movements. [read more ...]

[Click here to view poster]​​

Principal Investigator: Assistant Professor Lorenzo Masia​                                                             Current Project


Investigating Neurological Diseases by Robotic Agent

Preliminary analysis of non-dominant proprioceptive acuity and inter-limb asymmetry in the human wrist is being conducted.  It is known that impaired proprioception severely affects the control of gross and fine motor function. However, clinical assessment of proprioceptive deficits and its impact on motor function has been difficult to elucidate. Recent advances in haptic robotic interfaces designed for sensorimotor rehabilitation has enabled the use of such devices for the assessment of proprioceptive function. The aim of this project was to evaluate the proprioceptive acuity of the non-dominant wrist joint in flexion/extension and adduction/abduction and to compare these results to the acuity of the dominant wrist. To assess proprioceptive function, researchers obtained psychophysical thresholds for joint position sense (JPS) of participants. Two different stimuli were presented in each trial by the robotic device. [read more ...]                                                                    

[Click here to view poster]

Principal Investigator: Assistant Professor Lorenzo Masia​                                                             Current Project​


A Sensing System for Rehabilitation Exercise and Fall Monitoring or System for Home Alert & Rehab (SHARE)

Stroke rehabilitation is a time-consuming process that can take up to 6 months for a patient to relearn his missing capabilities. As the rehab exercise should be done daily, home is the most convenient place to do rehab after discharge. However, with limited home-visit from their therapists, patients can hardly effectively monitor their recovery progress or whether their exercise prescription should be adjusted. Adding tele-rehabilitation to the process could mitigate the problem by reducing the time lapse. Still, remote monitoring is not scalable enough to support all the stroke patients. Some forms of automatic performance summarization such as repetition or precision of each exercise session are also important to reduce therapists’ workload in the monitoring process and make tele-rehabilitation truly scalable. To practically achieve the goal, the sensing system must meet the balance between its required space, accuracy, ease of use and affordability. In addition, as a stroke patient usually has a high risk of falling, the system could use the same wearable sensing unit as a fall detector. [read more ...]

[Click here to view poster]​​

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                              Current Project​


Adaptive Balance Assistant for Daily Living

To study the balance problem focusing on problems related to motor tasks controlled by the synergy of control mechanisms allocated between the Central Nervous System (CNS), Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) and Muscle-skeletal system. The approach for balance rehabilitation is to focus more on training of the synergies rather than on single tasks of balance or gait. A device is being developed to bring such rehabilitation therapies into patients' everyday life activity. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​​


Pathological Tremor Modeling & Active Compensation via Functional Electrical Stimulations

We use the sensed physical motion and EMG signals from the upper limb to attenuate the pathological tremor in real time manner. A filtering algorithm will be developed to differentiate the intended motion and the tremor. [read more ...]




Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Pro-Balance

A mechatronic system provides neuromuscular and vestibular training for rehabilitation patients to improve balancing. Has 5 adjustable level of difficulty, 3 modes of exercise and assessment – multi-axial balancing, anterior-posterior balancing and left-right balancing. Provides real-time visual performance feedback. Records important performance indicators in a session. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


DEFROST (DEvice for FROzen Shoulder Therapy)

A mechatronic chain and sprocket trainer system that enhances the effectiveness and usability of the shoulder pulley kit for frozen shoulder therapy at the Singapore General Hospital (Department of Physiotherapy). More control over the plane and range of patients' arm motion during exercises. Provides real-time auditory and visual performance feedback. Records important performance indicators in an exercise session. [read more ...]


Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Objective Assessment of Upper Extremity Function in Neurorehabilitation

To develop a criterion-referenced approach to objectively assess upper extremity (UE) functions in neurorehabilitation. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Soft Robotics

More details coming soon.

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Motivation Driven Stroke Rehabilitation via Bio-Signal Control System

Restore voluntary motor function by bridging gap in damaged/diseased parts of nervous system. A brain-computer interface senses surface electroencephalogram signals elicited by motor imagery & processes it into semantic signals to control functional electrical stimulation of skeletal muscles. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​


Interactive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation System

This project proposes to integrate advanced techniques in complex system modeling, sensing, biomechanics, interactive digital media and human factors engineering with rehabilitation medicine to develop an intelligent interactive system for post stroke rehabilitation of the upper extremities. [read more ...]

Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​​


Multi-Flexor

A compact, modular and portable continuous passive motion (CPM) device for wrist and elbow therapy. [read more ...]



Principal Investigator: Associate Professor Ang Wei Tech                                                        Completed Project​​



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